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March 18, 2013  | by: Aanchal Jiwrajka
Twitter (Dior)

Twitter (Dior)

 

Last week, I attended some great lectures on design and architecture at the India Design Forum. A few people asked me, “As a fashion student, why are you attending these lectures and how are they helping you?” While trying to figure out an answer to this posed question, I figured that design, architecture, and fashion, all have one thing (of the many other things) in common – proportion, and  it plays a very integral role in any form of design.

Coco Chanel had once said “Fashion is architecture; it’s a matter of proportion.” While architecture still follows the mathematical proportions literally, in fashion, how does one find the perfect golden ratio?  We have all tried and tested how different silhouettes play up with different body shapes and sizes, but do we see standardized proportions in the fashion trends? As a fashion student, I have learnt a lot about the role of symmetry, volume and space in clothing, but is there an equation for the perfect ratio in fashion on the runways?

Until a while ago, every fashion era had its hit formula! There was the body-con a few years ago, the oversized baggy silhouette before that, and the pointy shoulders with skinny jeans recurring trend and many more in the history of fashion. But, this spring there isn’t just a single formula but more than one. We saw voluminous upper and slimmer bottom, or the complete opposite of broad bottom and low key upper, or the tall and slender silhouette making the runways. Here are the few blocks that built the structure for these trends:

Twitter (Laurepr)

Twitter (Laurepr)

 

One: The voluminous top with slim slender bottom is a trend seen for a couple of seasons now. Paring slim cigarette trousers with a loose blouse is the way to approach this look. A saque dress kind of look is not what we are aiming for, but instead, a soft structure with minimal design. Take a look at Balmain’s collection of strong oversized lapels paired with skinny trousers or an oversized structured white shirt along with cigarette pants like at Preen.

 

Twitter (Balenciaga)

Twitter (Balenciaga)

 

Two:  On the flipside- Slender top and voluminous bottom- is the other form of proportion we are eyeing this Spring. The Dior look of the full taffeta skirt with a basic tank is what we are imagining here. This look has a 50s vibe to it but is modernized by the stretched tank tops. Similarly, at Balenciaga as well, the flamenco inspired ruffles on the lower half with a corseted bodice depicted a similar type of silhouette. And for a less feminine approach to this look, Celine showcased fluid trousers with fitted T-shirts on the runway.

Three: Lastly, the skinny /slender silhouette look is about putting together slender dresses with big shoes. A sense of length is created by the slimming silhouette paired with high platforms. The key looks are that of Emilio Pucci and Bottega Veneta with their platforms and loafers . So the formula here is to wear your big shoes and slender outfit for a long and lean shape.

Twitter (dysfashional)

Twitter (dysfashional)

 

Although Spring trends have called for multiple ratios and proportions this season, you don’t need to use a lot of math for it. Nevertheless, everyone has their own formula; so which one are you going to follow this season?

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