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October 05, 2011  | by: Kyle Edwards

Dexter

I imagine watching baby snakes crawl out of a man’s torso in real life would be the most efficient way to purge my stomach of its contents. But through some kind of television magic, when this scene is viewed in close proximity with the serial-killing blood spatter analyst Dexter Morgan, it becomes a spectacle. Like the most desensitized of sociopaths, I share his fascination with the gruesome scene.

This is the kind of feeling I hoped would return with the season premiere of Dexter, and I can say with complete confidence that I’m not disappointed.

Dexter fans will be happy to hear the sixth season of the Showtime hit features Dexter returning to his roots. For those of you who aren’t in touch with your Dark Passenger, it means the show is finally good again. For reasons I won’t divulge (too many spoilers), Dexter is at least left unhindered – free to seek out and dispatch violent low-lives in his trademark fashion of plastic sheeting and high-grade cutlery. Michael C. Hall’s performance is spot on, and his character is as socially inept as ever, reaching its ultimate hilarity when Dexter visits his high school reunion and finds himself inexplicably popular.

After five seasons of run-ins with the police, the writers must have thought it time for Dexter to face a higher power: God. Along with confronting his own difficulties with faith, he finds himself up against a murderous professor of religion and his equally creepy apprentice (played by Edward James Olmos and Colin Hanks, respectively), as well as the suspicious born-again convict Brother Sam (Mos Def).

Dexter airs Sundays at 9 P.M. on Showtime.

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