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August 15, 2013  | by: Neil Protacio
Flickr (jon_elbaz)

Flickr (jon_elbaz)

 

Kendrick Lamar pressed all types of buttons and has become the talk of the rap town after he issued this challenge in his verse for Big Sean’s “Control”:

I’m usually homeboys with the same n—– I’m rhymin’ with/But this is hip-hop and them n—– should know what time it is/And that goes for Jermaine Cole, Big K.R.I.T., Wale/Pusha T, Meek Mill, A$AP Rocky, Drake/Big Sean, Jay Electron’, Tyler, Mac Miller/I got love for you all but I’m tryna murder you n—–.

In calling out some of the big names of the rap game, he inadvertently made some enemies along the way including P. Diddy, Lupe Fiasco, and Cassidy – all of which were not named in the song.

So explosive was Lamar’s attack that it completely overshadows the fact that the song wasn’t even his to begin with. Sure enough, twitter users were quick to capitalize, and for the past 24 hours Kendrick Lamar had been trending worldwide. It begs the question: was all of this a huge diss? Rivalry has always been apart of the hip-hop culture, and we can all date the battles back to the early 90’s. Case in point, Tupac versus Notorious B.I.G., Murder Inc. versus G-Unit, Nicki Minaj vs. Lil Kim – the list can be endless if we start to pint-point every song where a rapper took a shot at another rapper.

Take a look back at the lyrics and you’ll realize that yes, Lamar is indeed calling out his peers; however, it takes on more of a homage or an appreciation. “I got love for you all, but I’m tryna murder you n—–.”

Rappers shouldn’t take it personally. We all know what trials and tribulations these artists face when it comes to record sales and proving who’s got the best lyrical play. If anything, Lamar’s flow just challenges all other rappers to step it up and start producing some tracks that are worthy of being talked about. And honestly, the fact that we’re even having a discussion about this in the first place speaks volumes of Lamar’s celebrity. The fact that he got rappers to even respond – even the King of New York P. Diddy himself – HAH! It’s all over, folks.

Let this be a call to arms, not a warning shot. Read the names on the list and you’ll see that none of the legends are even up there to begin with, including Jay-Z, P. Diddy, Kanye West, or Snoop Dogg. Perhaps he’s just trying to rile up his peers to push out some better songs.

Either way, they heard you loud and clear, Lamar. Now duck for cover.

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