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November 01, 2012  | by: LaToya Harris

No electronics (Photo courtesy of sodahead.com

This week, Hurricane Sandy packed a punch for the east coast. The storm uprooted trees, homes, and buildings. It also left people homeless and looking for places to go.

The storm nicknamed “Frankenstorm” by meteorologists,  robbed thousands of people of their power, and I was one of them.

As a society, we are used to grabbing our cell phones to check our calendars or make a phone call. In fact, many people have traded their house phones for cell phones. We are used to turning on our computer and checking our emails, blogs, and social networking sites. We are used to turning on our lights when we need it, and turning on the television when we want to watch our favorite show.  We have become very dependent on technology, and it is a culture shock when it is absent from our lives.

This week, I found myself flipping switches and wishing for the electricity to come back on. Instead of turning on the television or my computer to catch up on the news, I picked up a radio and turned to my local news station to stay updated on the storm. Most people in my area lost cell phone service due to the cell towers losing power. As a result, we weren’t able to call loved ones and friends to check on them for a long time.

 

Hurricane Sandy (Photo courtesy of NYDailyNews.com)

With promises to restore electric service anywhere from 1-14 days, people have been forced to adapt to the conditions. Many have gone with relatives who have power or wait until their power comes back on. I am thankful to still have shelter when so many people have lost their homes and/or lives. One lesson that I have learned is to be sure to charge my old cell phones in case of an emergency. Did you lose power during Hurricane Sandy?

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