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September 08, 2012  | by: Julia Cuozzo

Fall TV 2012

As we progress into cooler temperatures and pumpkin flavored beverages, the best part about Fall is obviously the return of our favorite shows. From the looks of the premiere schedule, I am so glad I have Hulu because September 30th is going to be a doozy of a night for me, personally, and October 1st may have to help me pick up the slack. There are other benefits to being a Hulu subscriber including the privilege of watching certain premiers before the pilots pop up on cable.

The Mindy Project

The Mindy Project

Created, written, and produced by, and starring Mindy Kaling from The Office, this show follows a 31-year old OB/GYN who comes to the harsh realization that she is not the star of the romantic comedies that she has spent her life obsessing over. Full of punchy dialog, and hilarious scenarios (including an Ed Helms cameo and a separate drunk encounter with a mean doll at the bottom of a pool), this show looks very promising and something that should not be missed.

The New Normal

The New Normal

Another Ryan Murphy creation is ready to wow the world. This show is very cute and funny. I thought it was going to be like a B-list Modern Family that only focuses on Cam and Mitch, but it has a lot more to it than that. All of the characters are notably different, but just as easy to love and the pilot sets everyone up with room to grow. Ellen Barkin’s character, Jane, is a “bigot” who feels she is too young to be a grandmother despite the fact that she’s a great-grandmother. Her granddaughter, Goldie, portrayed by Georgia King, remembers that she has dreams and wants her daughter to have them, too, and of course, Justin Bartha and Andrew Rannells characters of David and Bryan are ready to grow as parents. Besides, any show with Justin Bartha and Ellen Barkin is definitely worth your time. Did I mention NeNe Leakes is in this, too?

Animal Practice

Animal Practice

Thank God that the ending of Weeds does not mean the ending of Justin Kirk’s presence in our lives. Add a collection of characters including Tyler Labine (who has worked on a lot of different projects but it should be noted that one of his earliest roles was on Breaker High, where he played Ryan Gosling’s best friend) MADtv’s Bobby Lee and the monkey from The Hangover II (yes, the same monkey), all of the personal problems that come with working with an ex, and it’s like Scrubs in an animal hospital.

Ben and Kate

Ben and Kate

I like when children on TV illustrate a higher cognitive ability than Honey Boo Boo. I also like when they surround that child with adults who are far from having it all together. Similar to Raising Hope, the child is being raised by a single parent and a family unit made of both, relatives and friends. Ben and Kate whittles down the relatives to a brother/sister combo who are complete opposites trying to live together with Kate’s five-year-old daughter. The pilot got a few laughs out of me but I feel like the characters are going to be more amusing than relatable.

Revolution

Revolution

This is definitely my drama for the season. The premise of the show is that one day, we lost all of our technology on Earth, and it happened at the same moment. Tablets, phones, cars, cable, airplanes, you name it, it died. A scene that subtly put it into perspective was when one of the main characters, Charlie, has a flashback to that night and her parents are letting her eat all the ice cream in the freezer on the day the lights went out. As she dove into the gallon before her, her father stresses the importance of locking in every bit of that memory because she’ll never have it again. That’s just the tip of how the world changes.

The show proceeds to fast forward 15 years and show us how everything has changed. Weapons get primitive. The use of muskets and archery skills come into play. People have crazy knife fights and use battle axes. They hunt for food,  governments fall and militias rise. It’s very detailed and I can tell that they are building toward a really good story line. One question remains: Is this the “1.000 years of darkness” that Chuck Norris and his wife were referring to? Because it’s only a TV show and has nothing to do with President Obama.

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