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October 31, 2011  | by: Kyle Edwards

The parenting group One Million Moms recently had a hand in having Ben and Jerry’s “Schweddy Balls” ice cream pulled from store shelves. After deeming the flavor’s name indecent, they gained enough support to send store managers cowering in fear of their threats of boycott.

At first, I could understand their reasoning. Not every parent wants to hear their child say, “Can I have some ‘Schweddy Balls?’” But then I saw this, and suddenly – in the kind of scene akin to when a sweet, elderly person makes a shocking display of racism – One Million Moms’ concerned parenting started looking a little bit like hate speech.

They have currently set their sights on the retail chain Target for advertising on Teen Nick during episodes of Degrassi and alongside announcements for TheTrevorHelpline.org, a helpline for LGBT youth. An excerpt from One Million Moms page claims:

They are openly recruiting teens and children to become ‘gay’ on a program that also promotes the transgender and homosexual lifestyle.

OMM wonders how the helpline helps a child or teenager who may be a bit confused about his or her sexuality, since it openly promotes that “if you call this helpline, you are not persuaded to walk away from the lifestyle. You are persuaded to be proud and embrace it.” Target and Teen Nick are being extremely irresponsible.

That wasn’t exactly on their mission statement.

One Million Moms has a whole list of prospective targets that may or may not have upset their delicate morals. They protest Chaz Bono’s appearance on Dancing with the Stars, criticize Lane Bryant catalogs and make strange analyses of charitable campaigns, all under the guise of parenting. But children don’t really watch DWTS or read Lane Bryant catalogs; or do they?

Does their logo include a homosexual couple holding hands?

The parent organization of One Million Moms, the American Family Association (which also runs the less productive One Million Dads), is far more open about their religious motives. And while I don’t have anything against promoting one’s religious beliefs, it is questionable whether many of the mothers and fathers working with their respective One Million groups have any knowledge of the underlying values of their campaigns.

But beyond anything else, I can’t help but question their emphasis on the entertainment industry. If TV is filled with such negativity, why own one? A piece of advice for these moms and dads: Spend the same amount of time talking with your kids about what they see on television as you do sending e-mails to networks and advertisers. I guarantee you’ll find out the only thing they care about is being kids.

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